Reading Your Published Work

I watched a Sylvia Day interview a few weeks ago and she said that once her work is published, she doesn’t read it. For the most part, I try to do that. I think that you tend to obsess over what could have been better, the comma that never made it in, or that one freaking typo. It’s a good thing.

But for new authors, like myself, you can learn a lot when reading your work. I’ve learned a lot about my characters (like the fact that Edric was insanely perfect, leading to a conflict I would have otherwise ignored in book two) and my writing. I have definitely grown as an author but there is always more to learn.

So, for the most part, I tend to stay away from my work because I tend to cringe when I read something I would’ve written differently now. But taking a look back into your past is all right. Granted, Mystic Waters isn’t that far into my past, but it feels like it was years ago. That is how much I’ve learned. You are always learning as writers and authors. I recently read and article that I’d love to share with you all. I think it’s such a great idea. Reading this article discussing “Thought” Verbs, had me hating some of my writing. Looking back on how Chuck Palahniuk changed his wording around to avoid “thought” was genius to me. And I agree with him, to an extent.

The biggest things to remember when publishing is that 1) you can’t change your words and 2) you shouldn’t anyway! You get to see your own growth. That is something rare. Not every career choice gives you the ability to see how far you’ve come. So, I’ll accept my being annoyed with my words from time to time and not wanting to go back and read but beneath it all, I’m happy with what I’ve done with Mystic Waters and even more so with Chasing the Tide.

growth

Now playing Skylar Grey’s Invisible.

All my love,
Cynth

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